Faber and Faber, London

Faber and Faber theatre books and plays


Faber and Faber
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Bloomsbury House, 74-77 Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DA, UK
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+44 (0)20 7927 3800
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Plays - click on covers to see full Publisher's details

Simon Gray
Cell Mates
Faber and Faber, London:

about a man named George Blake, who has been convicted for spying for the Russians and sentenced to forty-two years, and fellow prisoner, Sean Burke. Burke helped Blake escaped to Moscow, after which Blake did not want to let him return to his native Ireland.

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Lee Hall
Network
Faber and Faber, London:

"I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore." Howard Beale, news anchorman, isnt pulling in the viewers. In his final broadcast he unravels live on screen. But when the ratings soar, the network seize on their newfound populist prophet, and Howard becomes the biggest thing on TV.

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Sebastian Barry
On Blueberry Hill
Faber and Faber, London:

PJ and Christy: sworn enemies destined to share one small room for twenty years. As the two men recall the joys and torments of life outside  the childhood excursions, a deadly brawl, past loves and summer dresses  slowly they uncover the tragic events that have lead them to their cell in Montjoy. A play that explores our capacity to commit the deadliest of crimes but also our capacity for survival, reconciliation and love.

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Steven Berkoff
Greek and Decadence
Faber and Faber, London:

Greek came to me via Sophocles, trickling its way down the millennia until it reached the unimaginable wastelands of Tufnell Park - a land more fantasised than real, being an amalgam of the deadening war zones that some areas of London had become. Tufnell Park was just a word to play with - like our low comedians play with the sound of east Cheam for example - so no real offence to the inhabitants. In my eyes, Britain seemed to have become a gradually decaying island, preyed upon by the wandering hordes who saw no future for themselves in a society which had few ideals or messages to offer them. the violence that streamed through the streets, like an all-pervading effluence, the hideous Saturday night fever as the pubs belched out their dreary occupants, the killing and maiming at public sports, plus the casual slaughtering of political opponents in Northern Ireland, bespoke a society in which an emotional plague had taken root.
Decadence is a study of the ruling classes or upper classes, so called by virtue of the strangulated vowel tones rather than any real achievement. the voice is caught in the back of the throat and squashed so as to release as little emotion as possible, Consonants are hard and biting, since emotion is carried on the vowel. the upper class slur the vowel or produce a glottal stop, which by closing down of the glottis creates an impure vowel - as in 'hice' for 'house'. they move in awkward rapid gestures or quick jerks and sometimes speak at rapid speeds to avoid appearing to have any feeling for what they say. they achieve pleasure very often in direct relation to the pain they cause in achieving it. Particularly in causing intolerable suffering to achieve exquisite pates, boiling lobsters alive with other crustaceans and hunting down defenseless animals to give them (the hunters) a sense of purpose on Sundays. Creating the play was a desire to let loose the fantasies that inspired unbridled indulgence.

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Zinnie Harris
(the fall of) The Master Builder
Faber and Faber, London:

Halvard Solness has arrived at the pinnacle of his career. He has just been awarded the prestigious Master Builder award, his beautiful wife still loves him, his beautiful secretary still flirts with him and Prince Charles is coming to open his new building tomorrow. Then a knock at the door propels Solness past into everyones future. The only way is down.

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Aeschylus / David Greig
Suppliant Women, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Fifty women board a boat in North Africa. They flee across the Mediterranean, leaving everything behind. They are escaping forced marriage in their home and seeking asylum in Greece. Written 2,500 years ago, The Suppliant Women is one of the worlds oldest plays. Its about the plight of refugees, about moral and human rights, civil war, democracy and ultimately the triumph of love. It tells a story that echoes down the ages to find striking and poignant resonance today. Featuring in performance a chorus of local women, this is part play, part ritual, part theatrical archaeology. It explores fundamental questions of humanity: who are we, where do we belong and, if all goes wrong, who will take us in?

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Zinnie Harris
Meet Me At Dawn
Faber and Faber, London:

Two women wash up on a distant shore following a violent boating accident. Dazed by their experience, they look for a path home. But they discover that this unfamiliar land is not what it seems  and that, though they may be together, they have never been further apart. Unflinchingly honest and tenderly lyrical, Meet Me at Dawn is a modern fable exploring the triumph of everyday love, the mystery of grief, and the temptation to become lost in a fantasy future that will never be.

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Tony Harrison
Inky Digit of Defiance, The
Faber and Faber, London:

In this richly varied selection of Tony Harrisons provocative prose of the last fifty years, the great poet of page, stage and screen presents a lifetimes thinking about art and politics, creativity and mortality. In so doing, he takes us on an extraordinary journey through languages and across continents and millennia, from his Nigerian Lysistrata to the British Raj of his version of Racines Phèdre, to post-Communist Europe for the film Prometheus to a one-off performance of The Kaisers of Carnuntum at the Roman amphitheatre between Vienna and Bratislava, tothe peace camp at Greenham Common, and from a Leeds street bonfire celebrating the defeat of Japan by the new atomic bomb to wines made from the vines on volcanoes. A collection of work filled with passion and humour that educates as it dazzles.

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John Fowles
Lottery Of Love, The
Faber and Faber, London:

An eligible suitor has been found for Sylvia but, determined to judge him for herself, she swaps roles with her maid. Meanwhile the suitor and his manservant have the same idea. Before long each believes they are fatally attracted to their social opposite. Sylvia's well-intentioned father looks on as the two couples attempt to make sense of their desires and ultimately lose themselves to love. From eighteenth-century France, John Fowles transports us to Regency England in this elegant adaptation of Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard, Marivaux's greatest comedy.

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Patrick Marber
Don Juan In Soho
Faber and Faber, London:

Moliere's farcical, tragic, anarchic original of 1665 is relocated to modem day Soho: swank, new hotels and festering old clip joints, crackheads in alleys and cokeheads in clubs. the destitute, the delirious, the broken and the brazen, the hustlers and hoorays, the media movers and merciless whores - all packed into one seething square mile. Don Juan - the infamous amoral hedonist in a society entranced by sensation.
the theatre List

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Alan Bennett
History Boys, The
Faber and Faber, London:

an unruly bunch of bright, funny sixth-form boys in pursuit of sex, sport and a place at university. a mavErick english teacher at odds with the young and shrewd supply teacher. a headmaster obsessed with results; a history teacher who thinks he's a fool.. Staff room rivalry and the anarchy of adolescence provoke insistent questions about history and how you teach it; about education and its purpose.

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Owen Sheers
Mametz
Faber and Faber, London:

This large-scale, site-specific production performed in an ancient woodland near Usk, Monmouthshire, will give audiences a vivid glimpse into life - and death - in the trenches and battlefields of the Somme. Inspired by Welsh writer Owen Sheers' poem Mametz Wood, it will draw on written material by the poets who fought in or witnessed one of the war's bloodiest conflicts - the Battle of Mametz Wood, in which 4,000 of the the 38th (Welsh) Division were killed or wounded. Among the soldiers who took part were several key Welsh and English war poets, including Robert Graves, David Jones, Siegfried Sassoon and Llewelyn Wyn Griffith, and Sheers' own great, great uncle, William Cross.

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Lizzie Nunnery
Narvik
Faber and Faber, London:

Set in World War II, Narvik tells the story of a Liverpudlian man and a Norwegian woman pulled together and torn apart by war as the events of one summer cause ripples across an ocean of time. Lizzie Nunnery explores her dual creative strands - writer and singer/songwriter - to conjure a play where music and words meet, creating a patchwork of memory and dream, truth and fantasy.

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Tom Stoppard
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead
Faber and Faber, London:

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead is a play which, as it were, takes place in the wings of Hamlet, and finds both humour and poignancy in the situation of the ill-fated attendant lords.

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Brian Friel
Colected Plays 5
Faber and Faber, London:

This fifth collection of Brian Friel's work contains: Uncle Vanya (after Chekhov) (1998); The Yalta Game (after Chekhov) (2001); The Bear (after Chekhov) (2002); Afterplay (after 2002); Performances (2003); The Home Place (2005); Hedda Gabler (after Ibsen) (2005)

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Patrick Marber
Hedda Gabler
Faber and Faber, London:

Just married. Buried alive. Hedda longs to be free.

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David Watson
Ghosts
Faber and Faber, London:

Helen Alving spent years creating the illusion of a happy marriage to a successful, charming man. Long after his death, she is still trapped by the emotional after-effects of the truth - that he was a serial adulterer and a reckless alcoholic. Stifled by obligations and expectations, Helen resolves to exorcise the ghosts of the past and free herself from the regrets that haunt her. But when her artist son Oswald returns home, it becomes clear that he has already paid the price for his father's past. Some legacies are impossible to escape. Some ghosts can never be laid to rest.

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Brian Friel
Collected Plays 4
Faber and Faber, London:

This fourth collection of Brian Friel's work contains: The London Vertigo (after Macklin) (1992) (January); A Month in the Country (after Turgenev) (1992) (August); Wonderful Tennessee (1993); Molly Sweeney (1994); Give Me Your Answer, Do! (1997)

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E V Crowe
Sewing Group, The
Faber and Faber, London:

'I have spoken very clearly with her and I have told her that she is new here and that she must live how we live.' A woman arrives in a rural village in pre-industrial England. Her desire is to sew and learn from their simple way of life. But the group soon begins to suspect she is not who they thought she was. 'There's no point in just making quilts. They have to serve the village. They have to DO something.'

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Brian Friel
Three Sisters, The
Faber and Faber, London:

This third collection of Brian Friel's work contains: Three Sisters (Chekhov) (1981); The Communication Cord (1982); Fathers and Sons (Turgenev) (1987); Making History (1988); Dancing at Lughnasa (1990).

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Ross Dunsmore
Milk
Faber and Faber, London:

You know, love is milk, that's what it is. Three couples struggle to meet their basic needs for food, love and survival. As they try to make sense of a changing world, their inner desires and appetites become driving forces that could lead to catastrophe or redemption. An emotive and heartfelt play about what sustains us, what makes us sick and what we just can't get enough of.

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Brian Friel
Collected Plays 2
Faber and Faber, London:

This second collection of Brian Friel's work contains: The Freedom of the City (1973); Volunteers (1975); Living Quarters (1977); Aristocrats (1979) (March); Faith Healer (1979) (April); Translations (1980)

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Charlene James
Cuttin' It
Faber and Faber, London:

We're opposites, even though we came from the same, she's nuttin like me, an that shames me.' Teenagers Muna and Iqra get the same bus to school but they've never really spoken. Muna wears TopShop and sits on the top deck gossiping about Nicki Minaj's latest beef, while Iqra sits alone downstairs in her charity shop hand-me-downs. They were both born in Somalia but come from different worlds. But as they get closer, they realise that their families share a painful secret. Tackling the urgent issue of FGM in Britain, Charlene James' devastating new play reveals the price some girls pay to become a woman.

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Bryony Lavery
Brideshead Revisited
Faber and Faber, London:

It's 1943. Finding himself in familiar territory within the English countryside, Charles Ryder confronts memories of his first youthful encounter with Brideshead Castle and its assortment of eccentric inhabitants. In Bryony Lavery's sparkling new reimagining of the classic novel, past and present blur as Charles recalls those heady days at Brideshead as Lord and Lady Marchmain and their offspring, Julia, Cordelia, Bridey and Sebastian Flyte, re-emerge. . .

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Nick Payne
Elegy
Faber and Faber, London:

What if every neuron in the human brain could be mapped and decoded? Every act of human behaviour catalogued and wholly understood? Elegy imagines a very-near future in which radical and unprecedented advances in medical science mean that its now possible to augment and extend life. Through the beautiful and moving story of three women whove made the choice between love and survival, Elegy explores a world in which the brain is no longer a mystery to us. But at what cost?

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Christopher Hampton
Truth, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Michel is six months into an affair with Alice, the wife of his best friend Paul, who's been the lover of Michel's wife, Laurence, for the past 18 months, neatly pulling the wool over Michel's eyes, who, let's face it, isn't the brightest bulb in the chandelier, besides being a serial liar. How all this works out is at the heart of The Truth, an impudent, enjoyable farce about lying and the unexpected consequences thereof by France's newest favourite playwright, 35-year-old Florian Zeller. The essential prerequisite for the good liar is the unimpeachable innocence s/he presents to the world. Michel tries hard, but he's not very good at it. Compared to the rest, he's a naif, a babe in the woods, so that disaster almost happens, but hey, this is a farce, so a Happy Ending is a must.

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Anthony Weigh
Welcome Home, Captain Fox!
Faber and Faber, London:

Its the legendary hot summer of 1959 and while the Cold War rages and America tunes into I Love Lucy!, Captain Jack Fox, believed missing in action in the fields of France 15 years before, is about to be reunited with his family in The Hamptons. But is this really Jack Fox? And if it isnt, who is this man? And why are there 22 other families so intent on claiming him as their own?

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David Hare
Master Builder
Faber and Faber, London:

The change will come. And it's not far away, I promise you that. Some figure will emerge from the dark screaming 'Get out of the way'. And not far behind others will follow... The young are waiting. In all their power. Knocking on the door. The master builder Halvard Solness has a fear of falling. A self-made man, without professional qualifications, he has achieved domination in the town but he's increasingly frightened of being displaced by the young. A woman, Hilde Wangel, appears from the mountains, claiming to have known Solness ten years previously, and telling him of a promise he made to her when she thirteen. David Hare has written a new adaptation of one of Henrik Ibsen's most complex autobiographical masterpieces - a mesmeric exploration of control, power, lust and death, which builds to a vertiginous climax.

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Moira Buffini
wonder.land
Faber and Faber, London:

Aly is struggling with all the pressures of being a teenager: family, school, friends and her own insecurities. Then she discovers wonder.land - a mysterious online world where, perhaps, she can create a whole new life. The web becomes her looking-glass - but will Aly see who she really is?

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Moira Buffini
Moira Buffini: Plays 2
Faber and Faber, London:

Dinner: 'A cracking black comedy that has you laughing uproariously one moment and jumping with shock the next . . . For those with strong stomachs, Dinner offers a delicious feast of comedy and the macabre.'Daily Telegraph Dying for It: 'A subversive Russian classic: one that addresses the ultimate question of "why live?"' Guardian 'The play, freely adapted by Moira Buffini, presents a glorious gallery of comic types.' Independent Welcome to Thebes: 'It's thrilling. Moira Buffini's strange and daring play is moving, wise, funny, horrifying . . . Full of resonances you weren't expecting, jokes you didn't see coming . . . It raises huge questions with wit.' The Times Handbagged: Winner of the 2014 Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in an Affiliate Theatre 'A phenomenon.' Sunday Telegraph 'Perfectly pitched between the comic and the serious.' Guardian

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Penelope Skinner
Linda
Faber and Faber, London:

I'm an award-winning business woman. I'm happily married with two beautiful daughters and I still fit in the same size ten dress suit I did fifteen years ago. What could possibly threaten me? Linda Wilde has dedicated her life to changing the world. She's won awards for her efforts, at the same time as working hard to become an inspiring mother, and an independent, loving wife. Now, at 55, she seems to have it all. But Linda isn't satisfied. She's a woman in her prime and she's embarking on her most ambitious plan to date. But beneath the surface, the cracks are starting to show. "Old for a woman means worthless. Invisible. Of course we're terrified. You tell us we peak at sixteen and it's downhill all the way from there. Well I haven't worked this hard to be pushed aside at the last hurdle. I refuse to be silenced. I will not disappear. I am Linda Wilde. And I'm still here!"

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Wallace Shawn
Evening at the Talk House
Faber and Faber, London:

At Ted's instigation, the old gang gather once more at the almost legendary club The Talk House. Ten years on and presided over still by the kindly Nellie, there's the same genteel atmosphere, familiar drinks, unchanging special snacks. But the era of Walter Barclay is long gone. A playwright, a composer, an actress. The possibility of a pleasant night.

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Samuel Beckett
Waiting for Godot
Faber and Faber, London:

Bilingual Edition edition on facing pages. With the production of En attendant Godot in Paris in 1953, Beckett's work began to achieve widespread recognition. During his subsequent career as a playwright and novelist in both French and English he redefined the possibilities of prose fiction and writing for the theatre.

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Martin Crimp
Martin Crimp: Plays 3
Faber and Faber, London:

A classic selection of works from the acclaimed playwright: Fewer Emergencies; Cruel and Tender; The City; In the Republic of Happiness; Play House; Definitely The Bahamas

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David Hare
Moderate Soprano, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Nobody can doubt John Christie's passion or his formidable will: he wooed his opera singer wife with a determination befitting a man who won the Military Cross. Now, in 1934, this Etonian science teacher's admiration for the works of Wagner leads him to embark on an ambitious project: the construction of an Opera House on his estate in Sussex. But such is the scale of the enterprise that passion alone may not be enough. It's only when a famous violinist is accidentally fogged in overnight in Eastbourne that Christie first hears word of a group of refugees for whom life in Germany is becoming impossible. Perhaps they can deliver Christie's vision of the sublime - assuming of course they're willing to cast his wife in the lead. . .

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Ben Power
Husband and Sons
Faber and Faber, London:

Husbands & Sons interweaves three of D H Lawrence's greatest dramas, and plays them simultaneously. Describing the world he came from with fierce tenderness, Lawrence evokes a now-vanished world of manual labour and working class pride. It's risky work, handlin' men, my lass. For when a woman builds 'er life on men, either 'usbands or sons, she builds on summat as sooner or later brings the 'ouse down crash on 'er head - yi, she does. On the cracked border of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire stands the village of Eastwood. The women of the village, wives and mothers, struggle to hold their families and their own souls together in the shadow of the great Brinsley pit.

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Nicola Wilson
Plaques And Tangles
Faber and Faber, London:

I do not accept there is anything wrong with me Days before her wedding Megan discovers she has a 50-50 chance of developing early onset Alzheimer's. Years later she's offered a genetic test. But if she's got the gene does she really want to know? Megan, 21. Megan, 47. Megan, 32. Megan, 27. One woman lurches through time on a wild memory trip while her young family deal with the consequences. "I can't think. But I still feel. And most of the time I feel scared. Scared because it's too soon. I haven't finished yet."

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Alan Bennett
The Lady in the Van: The Complete Edition
Faber and Faber, London:

Adapted for the screen by the author from his celebrated memoir, Alan Bennett's The Lady in the Van, is directed by long-standing collaborator Nicholas Hytner. The film tells the true story of the relationship between Alan Bennett and the singular Miss Shepherd, a woman of uncertain origins who 'temporarily' parked her van in Bennett's London driveway and proceeded to live there for 15 years. Their unique story is funny, poignant and life-affirming. The Complete Lady in the Van contains a Foreword by Nicholas Hytner, a substantial Introduction with diary entries by Alan Bennett, the original memoir and the screenplay. The book includes numerous illustrations by David Gentleman, who sketched on set throughout filming, and a colour plate-section including behind-the-scenes photographs and stills from the film

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Simon Armitage
Odyssey, The: Missing Presumed Dead
Faber and Faber, London:

A high-ranking government minister with a colourful past is sent on a diplomatic mission to Istanbul. When his trip ends up in a bar room brawl, he becomes Europe's most wanted man overnight. Chased by the authorities, damned by religious leaders, pursued by those looking for vengeance and head-hunted by fanatics, his odyssey begins. Plunged into the ancient past, Odysseus must now contend with all the unworldly beings and unnatural phenomena that stand in his way. The Cyclops, the Sirens, witches, whirlpools and flesh-eating armies must all be overcome in the struggle for survival and the long voyage back home.

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David Hare
Young Chekhov
Faber and Faber, London:

Anton Chekhov is one of the undisputed masters of world drama. He is usually thought to hide himself behind his characters and stories, keeping his own personality well off-stage. But when he was young he wrote three plays - Platonov, Ivanov and The Seagull - which, with their thrilling sunbursts of youthful anger and romanticism, reveal a very different playwright from the one known by his mature, more familiar work. Young Chekhov brings these three blazing dramas together in versions by internationally acclaimed dramatist David Hare, offering the chance to explore the birth of a revolutionary dramatic voice. The plays show a writer freeing himself from the constraints of nineteenth-century melodrama and herald the shift into the twentieth century, and the birth of the modern stage.

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Rebecca Lenkiewicz
Jane Wenham: The Witch of Walkern
Faber and Faber, London:

Walkern 1712. A "witch" is hanged. The first in decades. While the village fears the return of witchery, the accused's daughter Ann befriends the local cunning woman: the solitary Jane Wenham. Days later, a tragedy occurs. Jane is accused of witchcraft - and Ann leads the charge. Inspired by events in a Hertfordshire village, Rebecca Lenkiewicz's beautiful, throat-catching new play is alive with mysteries of nature, sex and the supernatural, and blasts society's hunger to find - and create - witches.

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Marina Carr
Marina Carr: Plays 3
Faber and Faber, London:

The collection of plays by Marina Carr includes Sixteen Possible Glimpses; Phaedra Backwards; The Map of Argentina; Hecuba and Indigo

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Martin McDonagh
Hangmen
Faber and Faber, London:

I'm just as good as bloody Pierrepoint' In his small pub in Oldham, Harry is something of a local celebrity. But what's the second-best hangman in England to do on the day they've abolished hanging? Amongst the cub reporters and sycophantic pub regulars, dying to hear Harry's reaction to the news, a peculiar stranger lurks, with a very different motive for his visit. 'Don't worry. I may have my quirks but I'm not an animal. Or am I? One for the courts to discuss.'

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Lee Hall
Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour
Faber and Faber, London:

Catholic School Girls go Wild! The Choir Trip to the Capital goes badly wrong. Funny, Sad and Raucously Rude. A play about singing, sex and sambuca. With music by Handel, Bach and ELO! Adapted from Alan Warner's brilliant novel. Six girls on the cusp of change. Love, lust, pregnancy and death all spiral out of control in a single day. Warner's blisteringly funny dialogue ends in fireworks (literally). A musical play about losing your virginity and finding yourself.

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Patrick Marber
Red Lion, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Small-time semi-pro football, the non-league. A world away from the wealth and the television cameras. A young player touched with brilliance arrives from nowhere. An ambitious manager determines to make him his own. And the old soul of the club still has dreams of glory. A haunting and humorous new play about the dying romance of the great English game - and the tender, savage love that powers it.

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Annie Ryan
Girl is a Half-formed Thing, A
Faber and Faber, London:

This is a character of astonishing resilience and intelligence - a girl determined to make sense of things amidst the crushing Catholicism and deprivation of her Irish childhood. Rebellious, unrelenting, with biting wit and brilliant spark, Eimear McBride writes with an urgency that is totally electric in performance.

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Carol Ann Duffy
Everyman
Faber and Faber, London:

Everyman is successful, popular and riding high when Death comes calling. He is forced to abandon the life he has built and embark on a last, frantic search to recruit a friend, anyone, to speak in his defence. But Death is close behind, and time is running out. One of the great primal, spiritual myths, Everyman asks whether it is only in death that we can understand our lives. A cornerstone of English drama since the 15th Century, it now explodes onto the stage in a startling production with words by Carol Ann Duffy, Poet Laureate, and movement by Javier De Frutos. .

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Peter Gill
As Good a Time as Any
Faber and Faber, London:

As Good A Time As Any is a witty and ironic portrait of eight women on a Spring morning in London. The play is divided into five choruses: the eight women are the ordinary, unheroic inhabitants of the city, who speak for the continuity of everyday life, and its inexhaustibility. The world of As Good A Time As Any is on the face of it a small one, yet it has an intensity and depth of emotion which make it feel transcendent and universal.

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Peter Morgan
Audience, The
Faber and Faber, London:

For sixty years Elizabeth II has met each of her twelve Prime Ministers in a weekly audience at Buckingham Palace - a meeting like no other in British public life - it is private. Both parties have an unspoken agreement never to repeat what is said. Not even to their spouses. the Audience breaks this contract of silence and imagines a series of pivotal meetings between the Downing Street incumbents and their Queen. From Churchill to Cameron, each Prime Minister has used these private conversations as a sounding board and a confessional - sometimes intimate, sometimes explosive. From young mother to grandmother these private audiences chart the arc of the second Elizabethan Age. Politicians come and go through the revolving door of electoral politics, while she remains constant, waiting to welcome her next Prime Minister.

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April De Angelis
After Electra
Faber and Faber, London:

I blame the books they learned to read with. Daddy at the office. Mummy looking out of the window while she's washing up. I should have burnt them. It's Virgie's 81st birthday and she is bucking convention with a very surprising trick up her sleeve. But always a more committed artist than mother, Virgie has not reckoned on her family and friends' determination to thwart her distinctly unusual birthday plans. Will her loved ones consent to her last wish, or could the secrets of their past stand in the way? April De Angelis' After Electra is a deeply moving and blisteringly witty black comedy that re-imagines the meaning of family and explores how the choices we make can change our lives forever.

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John Osborne
Look Back In Anger
Faber and Faber, London:

Look Back in Anger transformed the face of British theatre; legend has it that audiences gasped at the sight of an ironing board on a London stage. John Osborne's play launched the 'angry young men' movement, writers from working or middle class background who had become disillusioned with British society, were sick of contemporary theatre's escapism, and wanted their work to reflect life as they knew it. The play tells the story of a love triangle between Jimmy, an intelligent and educated man of working class background, his upper-middle-class wife Alison, and her superior and disdainful best-friend Helena. Jimmy hates his wife's background, almost as much as he hates himself. Dark and savage, Look Back in Anger makes readers and audiences re-examine what was once called 'the good life'.

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Zinnie Harris
How To Hold Your Breath
Faber and Faber, London:

Because we live in Europe. Because nothing really bad happens. The worst is a bit of an inconvenience. Perhaps not such a good mini break. But really in the grand scheme of life, not so bad. Starting with a seemingly innocent one night stand, this darkly witty and magical play by Zinnie Harris dives into our recent European history. An epic look at the true cost of principles and how we live now

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Owen McCafferty
Death of A Comedian
Faber and Faber, London:

Steve Johnston, guided and inspired by his girlfriend, is a small-time comedian, raw, original and true. Until he's spotted by an agent, who suggests he could be so much more: his act just needs to change. It's a Faustian pact. As tension builds over the course of four gigs, so too do the audiences. But at what cost?

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Michael Pennington
Let Me Play the Lion Too
Faber and Faber, London:

How do you prepare for your first day on the set? Why might a bad audition lead to a good job offer? How should you research a new part? What's the effect of touring on your private life? How do you survive a long run? What about explicit love scenes? Can you have a glass of wine before a matinee? What's the difference between transitive and intransitive corpsing? What is stage fright? In Michael Pennington's highly personal guide and memoir there are sections on rehearsals, on television then and now, on who does what on a film set, on the disciplines and rewards of musical theatre, and five directors discuss why the scenery is better on radio. Disability and racial bias in the theatre are discussed and we sometimes hear from other, younger voices who are following parallel paths. There's a meeting with Robert de Niro, and an idiosyncratic A-Z covers everything from Availability to Max Factor, from Professional Jealousy to Understudying, from Voice Overs to Zhoozh. Infectiously enthusiastic, both conversational and profound, Let Me Play the Lion Too draws on the author's fifty years of experience to celebrate the deadly serious, sometimes hilarious, often misunderstood but infinitely enriching life of a professional actor.

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Bryony Lavery
Treasure Island
Faber and Faber, London:

Not one of us must breathe a word of what we've found. It's a dark and stormy night. Jim, the inn-keeper's granddaughter, opens the door to a terrifying stranger. At the old sailor's feet sits a huge sea-chest, full of secrets. Jim invites him in - and her dangerous voyage begins. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson's classic story of murder, money and mutiny, premiered at the National Theatre, London, in December 2014, in a thrilling adaptation by Bryony Lavery.

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Lee Hall
Shakespeare in Love
Faber and Faber, London:

Plagued by debt, tormented by writers block and in desperate need of a new hit, promising new playwright Will Shakespeare finds his muse in the form of passionate young noblewoman, Viola De Lesseps. Their forbidden love soon draws everyone, including Queen Elizabeth herself, into the drama and inspires Will to write the greatest love story of all time, Romeo and Juliet.

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David Hare
Behind the Beautiful Forevers
Faber and Faber, London:

India is surging with global ambition. But beyond the luxury hotels surrounding Mumbai airport lies a makeshift slum, full of people with plans of their own. Zehrunisa and her son Abdul aim to recycle enough rubbish to fund a proper house. Sunil, twelve and stunted, wants to eat until he's as tall as Kalu the thief. Asha seeks to steal government anti-poverty funds to turn herself into a 'first-class person', while her daughter Manju intends to become the slum's first female graduate. But their schemes are fragile; global recession threatens the garbage trade, and another slum-dweller is about to make an accusation that will destroy herself and shatter the neighbourhood.

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Polly Stenham
No Quarter
Faber and Faber, London:

Fleeing a world he has rejected, Robin finds solace in his music and the sanctuary of his remote family home. But as his kingdom begins to crumble around him, how far will he go to save it and at what cost?

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Simon Gray
Quartermaine's Terms
Faber and Faber, London:

the lives of seven teachers in the 1960's in an EFL school in Cambridge

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Rebecca Lenkiewicz
Rebecca Lenkiewicz: Plays 1
Faber and Faber, London:

This first collection of Rebecca Lenkiewicz's plays includes The Night Season, Shoreditch Madonna, Her Naked Skin and The Painter

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Rebecca Lenkiewicz
Turn of the Screw, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Miss Jessel is dead. A new governess arrives at a remote estate in Bly to care for Miles and Flora. Wild but angelic they charm their guardian with flowers, poetry and song. But as she grows to love her two wards, figures appear in the darkness outside and the corners of the house are haunted by those that have gone before. The Governess must confront her fear and protect the children from the alarming dangers that surround them.

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Martin Crimp
In The Republic Of Happiness
Faber and Faber, London:

A family Christmas is interrupted by the unexpected arrival of Uncle Bob. Who is he? Why has he come? Why does his wife stay out in the car? And what is the meaning of his long and outrageous message? All we can be sure of is that the world will never be the same again. In the Republic of Happiness is a provocative roll-call of contemporary obsessions.

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Alan Bennett
Hymn and Cocktail Sticks
Faber and Faber, London:

Alan Bennett writes: In 2001 the Medici Quartet commissioned the composer George Fenton to write them a piece commemorating their thirtieth anniversary. George Fenton appeared in my play Forty Years On and has written music for many of my plays since, and he asked me to collaborate on the commission. Hymn was the result. First performed at the Harrogate Festival in August 2001, it's a series of memoirs with music. Besides purely instrumental passages for the quartet, many of the speeches are under-scored, incorporating some of the hymns and music I remember from my childhood and youth. The text includes both words and music. Hymn is coupled with Cocktail Sticks, an oratorio without music that revisits some of the themes and conversations of Alan Bennett's memoir A Life Like Other People's. A son talks to his dead father as his mother yearns for a different life. It's funny, tender and sad. The pinnacle of my social life is a scrutty bit of lettuce and tomato and some tinned salmon. Mind you, I read in Ideal Home that if you mix tinned salmon with this soft cheese you can make it into one of those moussy things. Shove a bit of lemon on it and it looks really classy.

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E V Crowe
Hero
Faber and Faber, London:

"We can only do this, if we go by the book. announcing you're gay to minors is not in the book." That's in the other book. Danny's gay, a primary school teacher, and he's not afraid of anything. His colleague Jamie's straight, and thinks he should be. E V Crowe brings her distinctive voice to the story of a heroic modern man

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Owen McCafferty
Quietly
Faber and Faber, London:

Northern Ireland are playing Poland on the TV. Jimmy and Ian, two middle aged Belfast men are meeting tonight for the first time. They have a shared past. They need to talk. Quietly is a powerful story about violence and forgiveness.

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Nick Dear
Dark Earth And The Light Sky, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Deep in the Hampshire countryside Edward Thomas, disaffected husband, exhausted father and tormented writer, scrapes a living. In 1913 he meets American poet Robert Frost and everything changes. As their friendship blossoms Edward writes, emerging from his cocoon of self-doubt into one of the most influential poets of the twentieth century. But he makes the drastic decision to enlist, confounding his friends and family.

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James Fenton
Orphan Of Zhao, The
Faber and Faber, London:

In the aftermath of a violent coup, an epic story of self-sacrifice and revenge plays out as a young orphan discovers the shattering truth behind his childhood. Sometimes referred to as the Chinese Hamlet, and tracing its origins to the 4th century BC, The Orphan of Zhao was the first Chinese play to be translated in the West, and was adapted by Voltaire.

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Christopher Hampton
Uncle Vanya
Faber and Faber, London:

'It's often said that the best of the Chekhov plays is the one you've seen most recently. Uncle Vanya doesn't have a suicide, like The Seagull, or an adulterous couple and a duel more or less indistinguishable from murder, like Three Sisters; nor does it seem to announce the end of an era, like The Cherry Orchard: all it has is a series of ludicrously bungled attempts at murder and suicide and adultery. Perhaps these failures are what makes it feel the saddest and most truthful of these great tragi-comedies, in which, possibly unique to all drama, not a single word seems redundant or out of place.' - - From the author's introduction.

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Alan Bennett
People
Faber and Faber, London:

A sale? Why not? Release all your wonderful treasures onto the open market and they are there for everyone to enjoy. It's a kind of emancipation, a setting them free to range the world . . . a saleroom here, an exhibition there; art, Lady Stacpoole, is a rover. People spoil things; there are so many of them and the last thing one wants is them traipsing through one's house. But with the park a jungle and a bath on the billiard table, what is one to do? Dorothy wonders if an attic sale could be a solution.

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Frank McGuinness
Damned By Despair
Faber and Faber, London:

Obsessed with his own salvation, the hermit Paulo dedicates himself to ten years of prayerful penance. When his faith wavers, the ever-watchful Devil seizes the moment to convince him that he shares the fate of one Enrico, a notorious Neapolitan gangster destined for damnation. Swearing vengeance, Paulo lashes out against God and assembles a band of rival outlaws. "I'll match Enrico in mad badness. So, we're damned, both of us, are we? Then I'll be revenged on the whole world." And yet, even as their villainous crimes escalate, the possibility of redemption hovers over the two men, perhaps within reach. This fast-paced adventure story embraces bandits and beautiful women between glimpses of heaven and hell. The subversive and at times riotous exploration of faith and the transformative power of love races across the Italian landscape, relishing the unpredictability of fate, an extraordinary array of characters and their very real dilemmas. "Sinner I am - pray for me."

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Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard Plays 2
Faber and Faber, London:

This second collection of work by Tom Stoppard contains his radio plays, written between 1964 and 1991. These plays reflect the full range of Stoppard's gifts as well as his craftsmanship and versatility. His work for radio complements (and sometimes prefigures) his work for the stage. Included in this volume is In the Native State, which became the stage play Indian Ink (included in Tom Stoppard Plays 5). Also in this volume are The Dissolution of Dominic Boot, 'M' is for Moon Among Other Things, If You're Glad I'll Be Frank, Albert's Bridge, Where Are They Now?, Artist Descending a Staircase and The Dog It Was That Died. The collection is introduced by the author.

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Christopher Hampton
Appomattox
Faber and Faber, London:

4th March, 1865: On the night of his second inauguration, a few weeks before his assassination, Abraham Lincoln meets the veteran black abolitionist Frederick Douglass in the White House to discuss the prospect of extending the vote to black men who have served in the soon to be victorious Union armies. 4th March, 1965: In the White House, Lyndon Johnson, anxious to introduce a new Voting Rights Act, is briefed by his sinister and 'unfirable' FBI director, J. Edgar Hoover, on the imminent Selma to Montgomery march, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It is a demonstration prompted by a state trooper's murder of the young activist Jimmie Lee Jackson, in Marion, Alabama, following a rally in support of voter registration in Perry County. In his ambitious new play, commissioned by the Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis as the centrepiece of a retrospective of his plays and films, Christopher Hampton traces a line which runs from the last days of a brutal Civil War to the high-water mark of the Civil Rights movement and on, all the way to the present day; and considers the agonisingly slow healing of a wound, universal, but especially deep and painful in America: racism.

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Alan Hollinghurst
Bernice
Faber and Faber, London:

Bajazet: Roxanne the wife of the Sultan is madly in love with Bajazet. The Sultan is away but he has sent Roxanne an order to execute Bajazet
Berenice: "Let glory be our solace in our grief, And let the world acknowledge to the full Tears of an emperor, tears of a queen. Berenice's long and patient wait is over. Her lover, Titus, is now Emperor of Rome and with his succession, she can become his quee"n. But the Roman people make their disapproval known and Titus must choose between love and responsibility. Antiochus, Titus' best friend, is sent to comfort her, but reveals his own unrequited love for Berenice. In Berenice, Racine created a perfect tragedy of unfulfilled passion. In his new version, Man Booker Prize winner Alan Hollinghurst anatomises the agony of love.

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Tom Stoppard
Parade's End
Faber and Faber, London:

Tom Stoppard's dramatization for BBC TV of Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford will bring new readers to the novel as well as giving Stoppard's audience much that is original to his inventive version of a masterwork of modernist English literature. This is the story of Christopher Tietjens, the 'last Tory', his beautiful, disconcerting wife Sylvia, and the virginal young suffragette Valentine Wannop who completes this triangle of love among the English upper class before and during the Great War. Parade's End is a five-part drama, directed by Susanna White, with Benedict Cumberbatch, Rebecca Hall and Adelaide Clemens. This edition includes bonus scenes which were not broadcast, an introductory essay by Tom Stoppard, and a selection of stills from the production as well as photographs taken on location.

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David Hare
Judas Kiss, The
Faber and Faber, London:

If equal affection cannot be / Let the more loving one be me.' Auden's famous couplet expresses the dilemma at the heart of David Hare's fascinating exploration of Oscar Wilde's relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. The author speculates on two incidents in Wilde's life of which we know little, in order to present a play whose true subject is not Wilde, but love; not Bosie, but betrayal.

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Alan Ayckbourn
Surprises
Faber and Faber, London:

Love stories yet to happen, in a future filled with surprises. Who is the amorous stranger, Titus, who materialises in young Grace's bedroom? Can she believe he is who he says he is? For her parents, Franklin and Martha, does love everlasting still hold true if death is postponed indefinitely? Can lawyer Lorraine, who prides herself on her infallibility, have finally discovered the ideal partner, one who is also never wrong? Will lonely secretary Sylvia, after unhappy affairs with everyone from deep sea divers to space shuttle pilots, ever find her Mr Right?

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Owen Sheers
Two Worlds of Charlie F
Faber and Faber, London:

The Two Worlds of Charlie F is a soldier's view of service, injury and recovery. Moving from the war in Afghanistan, through the dream world of morphine-induced hallucinations to the physio rooms of Headley Court, the play explores the consequences of injury, both physical and psychological, and its effects on others as the soldiers fight to win the new battle for survival at home. One of the biggest names in the West End is joining forces with the nation's leading Armed Forces charity to offer a group of wounded, injured and sick Service personnel a once in a lifetime opportunity. The Theatre Royal Haymarket Masterclass Trust and The Royal British Legion, working in partnership with the Ministry of Defence, have brought together 30 wounded, injured and sick Service personnel from across Britain to write, produce and perform their own play on the West End stage. The Bravo 22 Company will present two performances only of a new play based on their experiences in conflict and in recovery, entitled "The Two Worlds of Charlie F", under the artistic auspices of Trevor Nunn CBE and with the support of Ray Winstone as the company's ambassador. The aim of the project is to use a learning environment to aid the recovery of wounded, injured and sick Service personnel. The project will introduce the Service personnel involved to leading theatrical professionals and will give early Service leaders career opportunities in the theatrical industry.

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Michael Wynne
Canvas
Faber and Faber, London:

Justine and Alan need to get away from it all. And what could be better than being at one with nature, camping, on a farm in the middle of the Welsh countryside? So long as that's camping with all the luxuries, of course - real beds, wood burning stoves, an espresso machine, even a kitchen sink. But what do they need to get away from? And how about seasoned campers Bridget and Rory? And upwardly mobile Amanda and Alistair? Why do they also need to get back to basics? The three couples find themselves in adjacent tents. But when the canvas walls let out all their secrets and when it's only their children who see eye-to-eye, perhaps the rural idyll isn't so perfect after all.

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Lisa D'Amour
Detroit
Faber and Faber, London:

n a suburb of a mid-sized American city, Ben and Mary welcome to the neighbourhood Sharon and Kenny who have moved in to the long-empty house next door. Fuelled by alcohol and backyard barbecues, their new friendship veers rapidly out of control as inhibitions are obliterated, laying bare the fragility of Ben and Mary's off-the-shelf lifestyle.

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Ivan Viripaev
Illusions
Faber and Faber, London:

I guess that's how it was meant to be. Love can only be mutual, I agree with you Albert, and forgive me for this cruel sincerity. Love and death, loyalty and betrayal, truth and fiction, this darkly beguiling new comedy takes us through a hall of mirrors. That's it, a little story.

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Owen McCafferty
Titanic (Scenes from the British Wreck Commissioners Inquiry, 1912)
Faber and Faber, London:

Titanic (Scenes from the British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry, 1912), by Owen McCafferty, is a courtroom drama full of intrigue, bravery and human frailty. At 11.40PM on 14 April 1912, the RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, struck an iceberg. At 2.20AM the following morning, the ship sank. 1,517 people died. In response to the disaster the British Government ordered an immediate inquiry and Lord Mersey was appointed Wreck Commissioner. The British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry sat from 2 May to 3 July 1912. It took testimony from 97 witnesses. Watch as a magnificent cast retell the survivors' stories - with dialogue taken word-for-word from 100-year old accounts.

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Mike Leigh
Grief
Faber and Faber, London:

1957. War widow Dorothy lives in a London suburb with her 15-year-old daughter Victoria and her older bachelor brother Edwin. More and more isolated from her married friends with their successful children, Dorothy tries to cope with Victoria's increasingly hostile behaviour. But is she doing her best, as she thinks, or is she in fact responsible for what threatens to become an unendurable situation?

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Martin Crimp
Definitely the Bahamas and Play House
Faber and Faber, London:

Sex, work, pregnancy, parents, weird neighbours, cleaning the fridge and dancing: Play House tells - in thirteen fleeting scenes - the story of a young couple's attempts to set up home. In Definitely the Bahamas, Frank and Milly relish the visits of Michael, their charming and successful only child. But what exactly is his relationship to the young student living in their house? Martin Crimp's Definitely the Bahamas was first staged at the Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond, in 1987. It was revived there with Play House, a new play, in March 2012.

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Richard Nelson
Farewell To The Theatre
Faber and Faber, London:

Widely regarded as the man who laid the foundations of modern British theatre, Harley Granville-Barker was famed for his Shakespeare productions and wrote and produced ground breaking new plays in the early twentieth century. He lectured at Cambridge, Oxford, Yale and Harvard. Richard Nelsons new play finds him embittered and world-weary in Massachusetts in 1916, with war raging in Europe, having fallen in with a group of British expatriates endeavouring to find their way in an academic, theatre obsessed community. Internecine, intrigue, lust and betrayal permeates this witty and absorbing study of human nature, as Granville Barker gradually rediscovers his love of the Art of theatre and his faith in its centrality to a life well lived.

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Stephen Unwin
Lady from the Sea, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Ellida, claustrophobic and restless, swims in the sea every day. She loves her husband Dr Wangel but, ten years ago, promised herself to another man. On a late summer's day he comes to claim her.

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Peter Gill
Provincial Life, A
Faber and Faber, London:

Chekhov's long story My Life, upon which this play is based, was written in 1896 during the period of his maturity as a story writer. His work of this time is a powerful reflection of contemporary Russian life. The story Ward 6 for example, set in a decrepit provincial hospital, with one terrible ward for the mentally sick, is such a strong image of the Russian intellectual's dilemma, that the young Lenin was reported after reading it 'to have been seized with such a horror that he could not bear to stay in his room. He went out to find someone to talk to; but it was too late: they had all gone to bed. "I had absolutely the feeling", he told his sister the next day, "that I was shut up in Ward 6 myself"'.

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Errol John
Moon On A Rainbow Shawl
Faber and Faber, London:

For the teeming populace of Old Mack's cacophonous yard in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, it's a cheek-by-jowl existence lived out on a sweltering public stage. Snatches of calypso compete with hymn tunes, drums and street cries as neighbours drink, brawl, pass judgment, make love, look out for each other and crave a better life. But Ephraim is no dreamer and nothing, not even the seductive Rosa, is going to stop him escaping his dead-end job for a fresh start in England. Set as returning troops from the Second World War fill the town with their raucous celebrations, Errol John's Moon on a Rainbow Shawl depicts a vibrant, cosmopolitan world that is as harsh as it is colourful.

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Harold Pinter
Harold Pinter: Plays 4
Faber and Faber, London:

This second revised edition of Harold Pinter's Plays 4 includes his most recent play, Celebration. Includes Betrayal, Monologue, One for the Road, Mountain Language, Family Voices, A Kind of Alaska, Victoria Station, Precisely, The New World Order, Party Time, Moonlight, Ashes to Ashes and Celebration.

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Jesse Briton
Bound
Faber and Faber, London:

A tragedy of maritime decline, Bound follows the fortunes of six trawlermen from Devon as they embark on one final voyage. Compelled by the threat of bankruptcy, the ageing fishing trawler The Violet is forced out into treacherous weather. Risking storms, friendships and relationships ashore, will the crew lose more than a way of life?

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Richard Nelson
Richard Nelson: Plays 2
Faber and Faber, London:

Three Plays of Adolescence: Goodnight Children Everywhere, Franny's Way and Madame Melville.

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Neil LaBute
Reasons To Be Pretty
Faber and Faber, London:

America's obsession with physical beauty is confronted headlong in this brutal and exhilarating new play. In reasons to be pretty, Greg's tight-knit social circle is thrown into turmoil when his offhanded remarks about a female coworker's pretty face (and his girlfriend's lack thereof) get back to said girlfriend. But that's just the beginning. Greg's best buddy Kent, and Kent's wife Carly also enter into the picture and the emotional equation becomes exponentially more complicated. As their relationship crumbles, their friends are pulled into the fray and all are forced to confront a sea of deceit, infidelity and betrayed trust in their journey to answer that oh-so-American question: How much is pretty worth?

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David Farr
Heart of Robin Hood, The
Faber and Faber, London:

The notorious Robin Hood and his band of outlaws steal from the rich, creating a fearsome reputation amongst those who dare to travel through the mighty forest of Sherwood. But they do not share their spoils with the poor and are unloved by the people, who must also pay unfair taxes to the evil Prince John as he plots to steal his brother's crown. In this time of chaos and fear, it is down to Marion to boldly protect the poor and convince Robin that he must listen to his heart if they are to save the country.

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John Hodge
Collaborators
Faber and Faber, London:

Moscow, 1938. A dangerous place to have a sense of humour; even more so a sense of freedom. Mikhail Bulgakov, living among dissidents, stalked by secret police, has both. And then he's offered a poisoned chalice: a commission to write a play about Stalin to celebrate his sixtieth birthday. Inspired by historical fact, Collaborators embarks on a surreal journey into the fevered imagination of the writer as he loses himself in a macabre and disturbingly funny relationship with the omnipotent subject of his drama. Killing my enemies is easy. The challenge is to change the way they think, to control their minds. And I think I controlled yours pretty well. In years to come, I'll be able to say: Bulgakov? Yeah, we even trained him. He gave up. He saw the light. We broke him, we can break anybody. It's man versus monster, Mikhail. And the monster always wins. John Hodge's blistering new play depicts a lethal game of cat and mouse through which the appalling compromises and humiliations inflicted on any artist by those with power are held up to scrutiny.

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Edna O'Brien
Country Girls, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Edna O'Brien's wonderful, wild and moving novel shocked the nation on its publication in 1960. Adapted for the stage by the author, The Country Girls, the play, is a highly theatrical and free-flowing telling of this classic coming-of-age story.

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April De Angelis
Jumpy
Faber and Faber, London:

A mother, a wife, and fifty, Hilary once protested at Greenham. Now her protests tend to focus on persuading her teenage daughter to go out fully clothed. A frank and funny family drama questioning parental anxieties and life after fifty.

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Alan Ayckbourn
Alan Ayckbourn Plays 4
Faber and Faber, London:

This fourth collection of Alan Ayckbourn's plays includes The Revengers' Comedies, Things We Do for Love, and House & Garden.

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John Osborne
Inadmissible Evidence
Faber and Faber, London:

Lawyer whose public and private lives are disintegrating

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Alan Ayckbourn
Alan Ayckbourn Plays 5
Faber and Faber, London:

This fifth collection of Alan Ayckbourn's plays includes Snake in the Grass, If I Were You, Life and Beth, My Wonderful Day and Life of Riley.

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David Hare
South Downs
Faber and Faber, London:

1962: A public school on the South Downs. John Blakemore is a solitary boy who finds it impossible either to understand or adapt to the ways of the school. His adolescent earnestness puts off teacher and pupil alike. And now suddenly he seems to be in danger of losing his only friend.

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David Greig
Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart, The
Faber and Faber, London:

the play tells the story of Prudencia Hart, a collector of folk songs, an academic who has devoted her life to the study of folk material. She comes to the village fair in search of songs for her thesis 'Paradigms of Emotional Contact in The Performance and Text of Traditional Folk Song in Scotland 1572 - 1798'. After the fair she finds herself at a "lock-in" with the locals where songs are sung and stories told. That's when she hears of the existence of the lost song, the song beyond song& the original song& the uncollected song. She sets off on a journey into the night to find it.

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Zinnie Harris
Wheel, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Beatriz and her sister Rosa are happily preparing for Rosa's wedding. Their world is turned upside down when the groom arrives, pitchfork rabble in tow, ready to occupy their farm. A little girl stumbles into their world, lost and looking for her father. In a moment of determination Beatriz takes the girl to find him - and so begins an unimaginable journey. Beatriz and her charge, in their need to survive, witness more than anyone ever should.

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David Harrower
Slow Air, A
Faber and Faber, London:

Morna works as a cleaner for well-off families in Edinburgh. She spends her time drinking mostly, attempting affairs and trying to work out the mind of her 20 year old son with whom she shares her Dalry flat. Athol, her elder brother by 2 years, lives in Houston, near Glasgow airport with his wife Evelyn. The owner of a floor tiling company, with two grown up children, he's proud of his hard-won achievements since moving West years before. Like any brother and sister they have fond and not-so fond memories of their upbringing, differing views on their parents and definite opinions about each other. Especially so in their case since Morna and Athol haven't spoken to each other in fourteen years&. . .When Morna's son Joshua travels west to make contact with Athol he sets off, for all of them, a remarkable and life-changing series of events.

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Penelope Skinner
Village Bike, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Becky's pregnant and frustrated. But her husband is more interested in the baby manual than her new underwear so she turns to the porn stash under the bed. As the summer heats up, a brief encounter sends her speeding downhill towards reckless abandon. A provocative and darkly comic look at fantasy and romance.

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Andrew Upton
Cherry Orchard, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Ranyevskaya returns more or less bankrupt after ten years abroad. Luxuriating in her fading moneyed world and regardless of the increasingly hostile forces outside, she and her brother snub the lucrative scheme of Lopakhin, a peasant turned entrepreneur, to save the family estate. In so doing, they put up their lives to auction and seal the fate of the beloved orchard. Set at the very start of the twentieth century, The Cherry Orchard captures a poignant moment in Russia's history as the country rolls inexorably towards 1917

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Harold Pinter
Moonlight
Faber and Faber, London:

In a dark space you can't measure, a once visceral father lies on his deathbed, looking over his life, his youth, loves, lusts and betrayals of his wife. At the same time, in another bedroom, somewhere in the same space, the man's two sons intellectually, clinically and conspiratorially speak of their relationship with their father. Side-stepping their estrangement from him, they rationalize their love-hate relationship with him and defend the distance they are incapable of closing, even when their mother calls them home. In contrast to these closed sons, is the man's daughter, the baby sister, who refuses the dourness and bridges the space between the light and dark, youth and age, and death and life.

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Neil LaBute
In A Forest, Dark and Deep
Faber and Faber, London:

Set on a stormy night in a forest, the play tells the story of a semi-estranged brother and sister who meet to clear out a family cabin. Bobby thinks hes simply lending his sister a hand with clearing out her cottage in the forest. But its a dark and stormy night and his sister has a secret.

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Lucy Caldwell
Notes To Future Self
Faber and Faber, London:

Sophie and Calliope have never been to school. Their mum ran away from home when she was seventeen to join the New Age movement and the girls have been raised in Goa, San Francisco and Morroco at a series of ashrams, communes and impromptu raves. Then one day Sophie gets ill and the family has to return to Birmingham. Sophie and Calliope are introduced to a strange new world where meditation and tree-hugging are replaced with Maths homework and television. Theyre also introduced to Daphne: the grandmother that the girls have never met. And its against this bewildering new backdrop  the normality shes always longed for  that Sophie must come to terms with her own mortality.

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Nick Dear
Frankenstein
Faber and Faber, London:

Childlike in his innocence but grotesque in form, Frankenstein's bewildered creature is cast out into a hostile universe by his horror-struck maker. Meeting with cruelty wherever he goes, the friendless Creature, increasingly desperate and vengeful, determines to track down his creator and strike a terrifying deal. Urgent concerns of scientific responsibility, parental neglect, cognitive development and the nature of good and evil are embedded within this thrilling and deeply disturbing classic gothic tale.

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John Donnelly
Knowledge, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Being a teacher means weekends. It means thirteen weeks holiday. It means a secure job in uncertain times. But Zoe doesnt want to have to rescue her students. She doesnt want to be called a slag. She doesnt want to sleep with the Head of Science. And she doesnt want to teach a group of kids how to do life. Because thats something Zoes not sure she knows how to do herself. Examining what happens when a young teacher goes off the rails in a failing school.

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Alan Ayckbourn
Season's Greetings
Faber and Faber, London:

On Boxing Day the previous nights fracas is passed off as a drunken romp. But was it?

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E V Crowe
Kin
Faber and Faber, London:

A girls' boarding school in the 1990s is no Malory Towers. Whilst Mimi learns her lines for John Proctor in the Christmas play, Janey desperately clings on to her best friend status. E V Crowe's Royal Court debut play is an intricate and anarchic view of what really goes on when ten year olds are away from home.

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Mike Packer
Inheritance
Faber and Faber, London:

Harry's had some bad news from the doctor and he's worried. Worried that, because of his life-long political convictions, he hasn't got anything to leave to his sons and grandchildren. So, by joining the property owning democracy, Harry thinks he's helping everyone out. Then the economic downturn gets in the way.

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Frank McGuinness
John Gabriel Borkman
Faber and Faber, London:

John Gabriel Borkman, wealthy, powerful, revered, sacrificed love for success and was handsomely rewarded. Now, disgraced and destitute after financial scandal and a jail sentence, he paces out each day alone, planning his comeback. Downstairs, his wife, Gunhild, lives a parallel existence, plotting for their son to restore the familys reputation. But with the arrival of Gunhilds twin sister Ella, the woman whose love Borkman gave away, the claustrophobic stasis is shattered once and for all.

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D C Jackson
Chooky Brae, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Its Christmas Day in Stewarton and Irene Gordons struggling to get in the festive spirit. Her 18 year-old daughter Normas just had a baby, her ex-husband Gordons just had a stroke and her eldest Barrys having a break down. Even the Dr Who Christmas special is disappointing. If this was a wonderful life she would receive some angelic intervention - instead she gets Rab McGuire and an escaped chicken that wont be stuffed.

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D C Jackson
My Romantic History
Faber and Faber, London:

"If you haven't met someone by the time you graduate, you're going to marry some idiot from your work. It's that simple. Do you know how they get animals to breed in captivity? They put them in the same cage." Office romances are tricky. One moment you're colleagues, then a quick grope after Friday night drinks and suddenly you're in a relationship. When Tom and Amy get together after an office social, they find themselves living in each other's pockets. But it's not their lack of chemistry that's the problem: it's that neither of them can quite get over their childhood sweethearts. A brand new comedy about love, loss and laminating machines.

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Bryony Lavery
Beautiful Burnout
Faber and Faber, London:

Four young men and a battling lassie are training in a Glasgow gym. They want to be champions and win fistfuls of money. They want to be like Calzaghe and land 950 punches out of 1000. Beautiful Burnout tells a bruising and lyrical tale of aspirations and counterpunches, delivered in a visceral, hearts-in-your-mouth production about one of the most controversial sports of our time.

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Nick Payne
Wanderlust
Faber and Faber, London:

Joy is a married woman, a GP, and struggling to remain interested in sex. Her husband Alan, however, thinks of little else. And their teenage son Tim is ready to burst.

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J T Rogers
Blood And Gifts
Faber and Faber, London:

My God, Russian soldiers being shot with Chinese bullets. Sometimes the world is so beautiful. 1981. As the Soviet army burns its way through Afghanistan and toward the critical Pakistani border, CIA operative Jim Warnock is sent to try and halt its bloody progress. Joining forces with a larger than life Afghan warlord and the Pakistani and British secret services, Jim spearheads the covert struggle. But in the face of mutual suspicion as the brutal chaos escalates, clear political action becomes impossible.

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N F Simpson
If So, Then Yes
Faber and Faber, London:

If So, Then Yes is a play charting a day in the life of Simpson's comic protagonist, octogenarian writer Geoffrey Wythenshaw, who sits down to dictate his autobiography from the comfort of a retirement home for the upper crust. Unfortunately, he finds himself constantly interrupted by his fellow residents, their visiting relatives, and the attending staff. Some seek a share of his wisdom, while others feel compelled to lend a hand in passing the time

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David Watson
Pieces of Vincent
Faber and Faber, London:

A hopeful young man, a teacher in love, a pregnant woman, A fearful policeman, a boy on a mission, a pianist in the rain. A wounded man, a grandmother. . .And Vincent. Nine lives fractured by the events of one tragic day. David Watson's thrilling new play tells the story of Vincent, a man estranged from his family and adrift in London. Reunited temporarily with his lost love, he finds himself in the wrong place at the wrong time. As Vincent's life changes forever, his destiny begins to affect a cast of characters across the country, from a remote house in County Down to the South Bank at sunset. A miniature epic about love, passion and violence in contemporary Britain. With a radical staging, and merging film and live action, Pieces of Vincent receives its world premiere in a bold new production directed by Clare Lizzimore.

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Alan Bennett
Habit Of Art, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Benjamin Britten, sailing uncomfortably close to the wind with his new opera, Death in Venice, seeks advice from his former collaborator and friend, W H Auden. During this imagined meeting, their first for twenty-five years, they are observed and interrupted by, amongst others, their future biographer and a young man from the local bus station. Alan Bennett's new play is as much about the theatre as it is about poetry or music. It looks at the unsettling desires of two difficult men, and at the ethics of biography. It reflects on growing old, on creativity and inspiration, and on persisting when all passion's spent: ultimately, on the habit of art.

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Martin Crimp
Misanthrope, The
Faber and Faber, London:

comedy of manners centres on highly principled man who cannot bring himself to temper the truth with tact

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David Hare
Power of Yes, The: A dramatist seeks to understand the financial crisis
Faber and Faber, London:

On 15 September 2008, capitalism came to a grinding halt. As sub-prime mortgages and toxic securities continued to dominate the headlines, this spring the National Theatre asked David Hare to write an urgent and immediate work to be staged this autumn that sought to find out what had happened, and why. Meeting with many of the key players from the financial world, David Hare has created The Power of Yes, which is not so much a play as a jaw-dropping account of how, as the banks went bust, capitalism was replaced by a socialism that bailed out the rich alone.

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Frank McGuinness
Greta Garbo Comes To Donegal
Faber and Faber, London:

Greta Garbo came to Donegal, and she did. The year is 1967 - nothing is ever the same after. Ireland is on the verge of violent change, two couples are on the verge of ending, a woman tries to save her family, a girl tries to save her future. Above it all but in the midst of things, determining what happens next, is the loveliest and loneliest of all women, the great Garbo. But when the gods arrive, they can cause havoc, not least to themselves, as the divine Greta learns.

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Sebastian Barry
Andersen's English
Faber and Faber, London:

About an imagined meeting between Victorian English novelist Charles Dickens and danish fairytale writer hans Christian Andersen.

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Alan Bennett
History Boys, The
Faber and Faber, London:

An unruly bunch of bright, funny sixth-form boys in pursuit of sex, sport and a place at university. A maverick English teacher at odds with the young and shrewd supply teacher. A headmaster obsessed with results; a history teacher who thinks he's a fool.. Staff room rivalry and the anarchy of adolescence provoke insistent questions about history and how you teach it; about education and its purpose.

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Brian Friel
Faith Healer
Faber and Faber, London:

In the course of four monologues the story unfolds of the travelling healer Frank who has gone all over Wales and Scotland with his wife Grace, and his manager Teddy. In their respective monologues, Frank, Grace and Teddy tell their differing versions of the healer's performance and of a terrible event that slowly comes into focus.

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David Greig
Dunsinane
Faber and Faber, London:

The vision of one man's desire to restore peace in a country ravaged by war. Set in the 11th century at the height of the fight for succession of the Scottish throne

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David Hare
My Zinc Bed
Faber and Faber, London:

continues the run of work in which Hare has sought to describe the atmosphere of contemporary Britain. A successful entrepreneur, Victor Quinn, employs a young poet, Paul Peplow, to decorate the legend of his fast-growing Internet business. Nothing prepares either man for the outcome

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David Harrower
Arthur Schnitzler's Sweet Nothings
Faber and Faber, London:

A young man has an affair with a married woman. He is terrified her husband will challenge him to a duel and kill him. At a party, he flirts with a girl who believes she is truly loved. Life seems full of joy. The doorbell rings. The husband enters the room. The power of sexual longing, the cruelty of tradition, the vulnerability of those in love.

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Owen McCafferty
Absence of Women, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Ian McElhinney, the most weighty of local thesps, is Iggy, short for Ignatius, and one of McCafferty's favourite first names. He'll never return to the Belfast he was forced to leave when his homosexuality was revealed in a boy's boxing club. Dour, in beanie and scuffed jacket, he's survived the decades, just, by downing pints, punching those who query him and burning, literally, his boats when that fails to wipe away the day he kissed ginger John so many years ago.
- Ian Hill, British Theatre Guide

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Frank McGuinness
Ghosts
Faber and Faber, London:

While McGuinness retains the Norwegian fjord setting, the Anglo-Irish inflection of his dialogue brings the tension between morality, integrity and religion closer to home. Robert Bowman's production for Bristol Old Vic is a mix of the compelling and the overcooked, sometimes tending towards melodrama but at its best burning with a suppressed, white-hot rage. Sian Thomas is Mrs Alving, the widow of a captain whose secret life of debauchery poisoned the family's outwardly respectable domesticity. Buttoned up to the throat in a tight, dark gown, Thomas vibrates with hskation and fear, disgusted by her own collusion in maintaining a lie, but desperate to keep her son, Oswald, free from the taint she dreads may be passed down from father to son. Anger boils all around her. The pale, sweaty, syphilitic Oswald seems diseased with a toxic hatred for his inadequate parents, worsened by his initial inability to comprehend entirely his own feelings. When he begs Mrs Alving to perform a mercy killing should his suffering become too acute, his greatest horror is that his illness should reduce him to a baby, once again putting him wholly under the control of a mother who, for all her smothering, guilt-ridden devotion, has failed him. There's another problematic parent-child relationship, between the lame, drunkard carpenter Engstrand and his supposed daughter, Mrs Alving's maid Regine. Regine regards Engstrand as a kind of devil, and his mined foot in its clumsy built-up shoe as a cloven hoof; his plans for her future are devious and morally dubious. Yet he suggests a father who genuinely seeks contentment, albeit of a warped kind, with his cruelly contemptuous child. The tears that fill his eyes when the ambitious Regine rejects him are moving but also richly ironic: she is not, in fact, his daughter, but the illegitimate offspring of dead Alving.
Sam Marlowe, The Times

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Edna O'Brien
Haunted
Faber and Faber, London:

A woman's husband is captivated by a young woman and secretly starts giving away his wife's clothes in exchange for elocution lesson.
- British Theatre Guide

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Penelope Skinner
Eisengrau
Faber and Faber, London:

Two sets of housemates, all with very different beliefs, are thrown together by circumstances as their beliefs are put to the test.

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Andrew Upton
Mikhail Bulgakov's The White Guard
Faber and Faber, London:

In Kiev during the Russian civil war, the Turbin household is sanctuary to a ragtag, close-knit crowd presided over by the beautiful Lena. As her brothers prepare to fight for the White Guard, friends charge in from the riotous streets amidst an atmosphere of heady chaos, quaffing vodka, keeling over, declaiming, taking baths, playing guitar, falling in love. But the new regime is poised and in its brutal triumph lies destruction for the Turbins and their world.

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Ben Brown
Promise, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Chaim Weizmann, later the first president of the State of Israel, was a Jewish émigré from Russian who, while Professor of Chemistry at Manchester University, made a significant contribution to the British military effort during the First World War by developing a way of producing acetone. He was also an ardent Zionist lobbying the British government's support for the establishment of a Jewish homeland. This play begins in December 1914 when it was already becoming clear that if the war should topple the Turkish Empire, with the participant allies haggling for control in the Middle East, it would provide an opportunity for territorial changes. Weizmann (Jonathan Tafler) has already secured a meeting in Whitehall and he is in the office of Herbert Samuel (Richard Clothier) about to outline his proposals. It ends with the opening of the Jewish University in Jerusalem in 1925, completion of the first stage of Weizmann's Zionist dream. It takes us into the centre of government, with ministers around a table in Number 10 under both the Asquith and Lloyd George administrations . We are given the heart of the discussions on support for a Jewish state that led to the Balfour Declaration of 1917. This, the British 'promise', was a key element in the creation of today's problems in the Middle East.
- Howard Loxton, British Theatre Guide

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Christopher Hampton
Les Liaisons Dangereuses
Faber and Faber, London:

A clever game of passion and manipulation, seduction and destruction.

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Anthony Jay and Jonathan Lynn
Yes, Prime Minister
Faber and Faber, London:

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Tom Stoppard
Real Thing, The
Faber and Faber, London:

Playwright's tremulous marriage to an actress is reflected in his life and work. The opening scene shows cuckolded husband Max remorsefully deconstructing the alibi of his wife, Charlotte, as she tries to sustain the fiction of having been in Geneva. In scene two, we see Charlotte bedded in with her new paramour, playwright Peter. But when Max breezes in for Sunday brunch with wife Annie, the construct is revealed: Max and Charlotte were playing characters in a drama written by Peter. But then Peter falls for Annie and things begin to get very Stoppardian indeed.

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